Having a baby doesn’t mean the end of your sex life. But birth and parenthood are big events that are likely to change the kind of sex you have and how often you have it.
Having a baby;is an amazing, life-changing experience. But no matter how in love you are with your little one, caring for a;newborn;can take a serious toll on your;sex;life.
Sex and intimacy is often tough for new parents – less time, tiredness, hormonal changes and worries about contraception can make it tricky.
If you and your partner have both gone a bit cool on sex, it’s no problem. But if you and your partner have different levels of sexual desire, this can add some stress to your relationship.
In most relationships, things do get back on track, but it’s important to be patient. If you’re concerned that your sex life is off track, talk with your GP.
After giving birth, you might feel like you’ll never have sex again. But you will heal and;your interest in sex will return. For many women, this happens within 1-3 months of your baby’s birth, but it’s normal for it to take longer.
Some mums find that they feel sensual and sexual when breastfeeding their baby. This is partly because of the hormone;oxytocin, which is involved in milk;let-down;and also sexual arousal. It’s completely normal.
It’s also normal for breastfeeding mums to find that they have less interest in sex when they’re breastfeeding.
Your body undergoes changes after delivery:-
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Sex and intimacy after a baby
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Having a baby doesn’t mean the end of your sex life. But birth and parenthood are big events that are likely to change the kind of sex you have and how often you have it.
On this page:Sex after baby: how your sexual relationship might changeWomen: your sexual feelings after giving birthYour body after giving birthWhen to have sex again after babyContraception after a babyYour feelings and your partner’s feelings about sexRebuilding intimacy: ideasLooking after yourselfWhere to get help
Sex after baby: how your sexual relationship might change
Sex and intimacy is often tough for new parents – less time, tiredness, hormonal changes and worries about contraception can make it tricky.
If you and your partner have both gone a bit cool on sex, it’s no problem. But if you and your partner have different levels of sexual desire, this can add some stress to your relationship.
In most relationships, things do get back on track, but it’s important to be patient. If you’re concerned that your sex life is off track, talk with your GP.
Women: your sexual feelings after giving birth
After giving birth, you might feel like you’ll never have sex again. But you will heal and;your interest in sex will return. For many women, this happens within 1-3 months of your baby’s birth, but it’s normal for it to take longer.
Some mums find that they feel sensual and sexual when breastfeeding their baby. This is partly because of the hormone;oxytocin, which is involved in milk;let-down;and also sexual arousal. It’s completely normal.
It’s also normal for breastfeeding mums to find that they have less interest in sex when they’re breastfeeding.
One Australian study found that within six weeks of giving birth, about 40% of first-time mums tried having sex. By 12 weeks after giving birth, almost 80% of first-time mums had tried having sex. Mums who’d given birth by caesarean or had stitches were more likely to wait longer before having sex.
Your body after giving birth undergoes many changes:-
Your body will probably look different after having a baby, even a few months after you’ve given birth. It might not be the same shape, and you might not be the same weight as before.
✔loose abdominal skin and muscle toneenlarged breasts (your breasts might get smaller if you aren’t breastfeeding)
✔patchy colour changes to your nipplesstretch marks on your tummy, breasts, hips or thighs
✔vaginal grazes
✔episiotomy or caesarean scars
✔varicose veins in your legs
✔weight gain (you’ll lose weight after the birth from your baby, the placenta and the amniotic fluid).
When to have sex again is mostly about when you feel ready (unless your doctor has advised otherwise).
If you’ve had a difficult birth or stitches,;your body;will need time to heal. Many mums feel pain or discomfort during sex, but this usually improves with time. Using a lubricant or oestrogen creams might make sex more comfortable. Sometimes discomfort can be because of muscle spasms or;anxiety.
On the other hand, some new mums and their partners find that sex is less satisfying because the muscles are too loose after being stretched during the birth. The muscles will gain tone again –;pelvic floor exercises;can help.
If you’re breastfeeding, you might find that milk leaks from your breasts during sex and that vaginal dryness is a problem. Try feeding your baby, or expressing, before having sex. Using a lubricant can help with this too.
Contraception after a baby
As new parents, you might not be ready to have another baby yet, so it’s a good idea to think about contraception before you start having sex again. Your doctor or midwife will usually talk with you about contraception at the six-week check-up for mum and baby. If you and your partner want to have sex before then,;talk to your GP or midwife about contraception.
Some mums are fertile, or have started to ovulate, even before they have a period. This increases their chance of becoming pregnant if they have sex without using contraception.
You might have been told that;breastfeedingmakes it less likely you’ll become pregnant. This can sometimes be the case if new mums:
✔are exclusively breastfeeding day and night
✔aren’t giving their baby any other food or drink (just breastmilk)
✔have a baby that is under six months old
✔haven’t had a period since giving birth.
But keep in mind that;there’s no guarantee. You might still get pregnant if you’re having sex without using contraception. #sexandbaby #sexlifeasaparent #sexlife #happylife #babychakra #parentingglossary #mom #afterbaby #happymoments #intimacy #husbandlove #wifelove #bonding


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