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Q:

Can someone please guide me over 2 points:

1) how to stop breastfeeding to baby

2) how to introduce top milk to baby



Weaning the baby from breastfeeding is not an easy thing to do. A sudden wean can be upsetting for the child. Slower the weaning occurs, the more time your child gets to adapt to the change easily. The rule is be patient and consistent. Here are five simple tips to wean your baby from breastfeeding
Try to shorten the time span of the feeds, for example if you are regularly feeding your baby for ten minutes, shortening it to five minutes initially will help.
Offer sipper cups of their choice and look for their reaction and acceptance. Keep in mind that if you wean your child to a bottle, you'll eventually have to wean him or her to a cup.
Gradually reduce the day feeds. Try to omit one breastfeeding session a week probably the most inconvenient feeding for you or the one your baby is least interested in.

If you want your baby to detach from the habit of breastfeeding in the night time, make the kid avoid short naps in the day. Try to distract and make them play. So when they become tired they peacefully sleep all night without in between feeds.
For a while, sleep in a separate bed close to the baby. I know it is difficult to accept but try to ask your husband or whoever your baby is comfortable with to put her or him to sleep for two or three days, I'm sure this will help but you really need to be a cold duck, but it works for working mom's especially when they can afford to take off a weekend end break.
The complete weaning process will take time depending on your approach. You need to be persistent to see results. By offering plenty of love and affection during this period, you can help your child make a smooth transition.

As the child grows, increase the number of times that the child is fed: 2–3 meals per day for infants 6–8 months of age and 3–4 meals per day for infants 9–23 months of age, with 1–2 additional snacks as required; use fortified complementary foods or vitamin-mineral supplements as needed and gradually increase food consistency and variety. Over and above the nutritional benefits, complementary feeding can strengthen the bond between children and their parents. After the age of 6 months, breastfeeding alone is no longer enough for optimal growth and development of the child. Hence, it is necessary to start complementary feeding (CF) along with breast milk. As the child grows, increase the number of times that the child is fed: 2–3 meals per day for infants 6–8 months of age and 3–4 meals per day for infants 9–23 months of age, with 1–2 additional snacks as required; use fortified complementary foods or vitamin-mineral supplements as needed and gradually increase food consistency and variety. Over and above the nutritional benefits, complementary feeding can strengthen the bond between children and their parents. Avoid foods such as whole nuts, seeds, corn chips, hard lollies, raw carrot, and chunks of apple. There is no need to add sugar or salt to foods. They can cause tooth decay and can make extra work for your baby's small kidneys. Cow's milk should not be given as a drink until 12 months of age.


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